Blues top Cascades to open home-and-home set

Cassidy King notched a team-high 13 digs on Friday vs. Capilano.

The Capilano Blues got the best of an injury-riddled University of the Fraser Valley women’s volleyball squad on Friday evening, winning in three straight sets at the Envision Athletic Centre.

With a starting setter Jessica Funk and left side Kim Bauder sidelined due to injury, the Cascades managed to hit the 20-point plateau in each set, but the Blues – ranked No. 10 in the nation – were just a bit stronger at the finish and prevailed by scores of 25-23, 25-21 and 25-20.

Kelly Robertson stepped into the starting lineup at left side and delivered 13 kills.

UFV (5-10) and Capilano (10-5) clash again on Saturday at 6 p.m. in North Vancouver to complete the home-and-home weekend series (webcast at pacwestbc.tv).

Cascades head coach Mike Gilray noted that three Cascades were making their 2016-17 regular-season debuts in the starting lineup on Friday: setter Channelle Friesen, left side Kelly Robertson and libero Cassidy King.

“I thought all three of them performed admirably,” he said. “I thought our energy levels were the best they’ve been all year, and that’s a competitive team to play against.

“One of the things we’ve talked about this year is our depth, and our depth helped us compete against a top-10 ranked team in the country tonight. We were within five every game, and I think we had our opportunities at 20 in all three games but it kind of got away from us a bit.

“It’s a long season, every team’s got to get through them (injuries), and it’ll make us a better team in the end.”

Robertson sparked the UFV offence with 13 kills and added 12 digs. King (a team-high 13 digs) and Rachel Funk (two stuff blocks) chipped in defensively.

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The University of the Fraser Valley is situated on the unceded traditional territory of the Stó:lō peoples. The Stó:lō have an intrinsic relationship with what they refer to as S’olh Temexw (Our Sacred Land); therefore, we express our gratitude and respect for the honour of living and working in this territory.

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