Cascades outlast Chargers in five-set thriller

The University of the Fraser Valley women’s volleyball team and the Camosun Chargers brought out the best in each other on Friday evening in Victoria, engaging in an exciting five-set match that saw the Cascades emerge victorious.

Jessica Funk piloted the Cascades’ offence to victory on Friday in Victoria. (UFV Athletics file photo)

The two teams alternated set wins throughout, with UFV ultimately prevailing 25-20, 20-25, 25-22, 19-25, 15-11.

The victory enabled the Cascades (6-11) to leapfrog the Chargers (5-10) for fifth place in the PACWEST standings. The two teams battle again on Friday afternoon (1 p.m., webcast at pacwestbc.tv).

“It was a very offensive match, for sure,” UFV head coach Mike Gilray said. “It was tough on the defences, because people were really swinging which was good to see.”

Kim Bauder paced the Cascades’ offence – shifted to the right side after spending most of the season on the left, she hit .441 with 15 kills and just three errors, highlighted by a crosscourt shot for the winning point in the fifth set.

Setter Jessica Funk racked up 55 assists and a team-high 12 digs, and was among four Cascades in double-figure digs along with Bauder, Amy Davidson and Rachel Funk. Left side Cassidy Pearson had a strong performance off the bench, earning critical points for UFV in the fifth, and middle Mandelyn Erikson had a team-high three blocks.

“It was a bit of an unforced errors game . . . but we responded well,” Gilray summarized. “We were making too many unforced errors in the sets we were losing. But when we stopped doing that, we were winning a higher percentage of points than they were and put ourselves in a good position to win.”

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